The Power of 2!

As many of you know, my father joined me this week to lend a much needed hand. Not only did he lend a hand, but he has become the tincture to help balance out things. You see, up to this point I have been working 14-16 hour days and things have been VERY unbalanced. I haven’t been eating regularly, sleeping regularly, or generally living regularly. Dad has added some balance and helped changed that. He reminds me when its lunch, dinner, bed time and most importantly shower time (yes, I was forgetting to shower for a few days). One can only keep up that kind of crazy pace for so long before you hit a wall. Having dad here, has stopped me from hitting that wall.

 

So what have we been working on?

Well our first day, we tackled the dreaded “re-bedding project”. This involves removing EVERY item that is bolted to the deck of the boat, removing the old sealant, and resealing those items, then bolting them back down. This may sound like a simple job, but on a sailboat, there are literally close to 50 items bolted to the deck, each with multiple fasteners. Its frankly a crappy job with one person on the inside of the boat and one person on the outside of the boat trying to work together to remove item. Its made much harder by the guys working on the shipwreck recovery boat using air hammers on the steel hull of their boat, Then add the myriad of fighter planes that fly sorties every 10 min (Boca Chica airbase)  and trying to talk to one another, even with open windows becomes impossible. We naturally created a series of visual maneuvers to help move things along. i.e. Just moving the fastener that you want to work on now.  We got through %80 of the re-bedding project, but had to put a couple of items on hold due to “technical issues”. I’m pretty sure a soccer game came on when the workers were originally bedding those items in South Africa. They just had a “Fuck it” moment and just made it “look” right.

 

While those items were on hold so they could be fixed correctly, we moved on to thru-hulls. Only to discover, that the replacement thru-hulls I ordered would not fit. Ahhh boats.. SONOFABITCHEN boats.. So I called the manufacturer only to discover the thru-hulls were only sold to OEM (i.e. boat manufacturers) and the threads were proprietary. Are to F’n kidding me, proprietary threads. When I told the guy that, he said, “Well they last 50 years, so why would you need to change them?”. I literally laughed in his face, then proceeded to tell him that NOTHING on a boat would ever last 50 year, let alone 20 years. He insisted they rarely fail. Hhhmmm I must have won the lottery cause 3 of mine were leaking in just 12 years. To which he replied, “That is only the sealant, not the thru-hull, just take them out and reseal them”! To which I replied “The sealant has a bond strength 7 times over the destructive force of the thru-hull. How would you propose I remove the thru-hull without destroying them?” Dead silence… Then “Please give me your credit card number and I will send you all new ones!”.  Hey Forespar, please hire people who have actually been on boats and know what they are talking about. Also, please fire ANYONE quoting a 50 year life on any product you sell. That is complete horseshit!

 

So delayed again.. We just got drunk………………. Kidding, we moved on to the above water thru-hulls. At lease I was able to source these locally so we had no problem moving forward here. I have to say, its pretty neat to see the holes in the boat begin to close up! All the above water thru hulls were finished today.

 

As an aside, I’m not as smart as dad (he wore gloves), so I will be proudly wearing Sika 291 (the sealant) on my hands, hair, arms, clothes and lips (YES LIPS) for the next 2-3 weeks. That shit is the most tenacious chemical I have ever worked with and many joke that “You can get a dirty ear just ordering it on the phone”. I’m not so sure its a joke. At one point, I used acetone to remove some uncured 291 from my tooth, hmm tasty.

 

 

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